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Archive for the ‘products’ Category

I just completed the training for SCRUM Product Owner with Agile Learning Labs. Chris Sims was a very good instructor. He explained the what, the how, and the why of a Product Owner (PO), as well as the PO’s responsibilities to the stakeholders and to the development team. Successful PO needs to regularly prioritize user stories relative to the potentially changing requirements and valuation of the stories from the stakeholders. At the same time, the PO needs to fit an appropriate number of stories, by story points, relative to the capacity of each sprint. Asides from various exercises, the training included a half-day simulation that ran thru 4 sprints. That helped me understand what really is needed and expected from the product owner in the SCRUM process.

Chris also showed a video from Henrik Kniberg that illustrates the process of SCRUM from the perspective of a product owner. I found this video succinctly explains the process of SCRUM as well:

 

 

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How to draw an owl

I attended Ted Blosser‘s presentation on Box’s new metadata API and he showed a great description of the fast-fail approach to developing products, developed by the founder of Twillio:

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To draw an owl, just start with 2 ovals that look like an owl, then fill in the details via quick iterations.  Twillio describes this as “There’s no instruction book, it’s ours to draw. Figure it out, ship it and iterate.”

Ted said that while Box’s target customers are enterprises, Box can still approach product releases using this approach.

This applies well to new product development with the goal of getting to the product with features that maximizes customer value and thus revenue, in a series of quick iterations.

I think key to success consists of

(1) starting with a framework (the 2 ovals) that has a high chance of success

(2) having the discipline to identify likely failure of the framework if that occurs, and then abandon the project quickly, not be bothered with the sunk cost.

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